Many vintage custom truck enthusiasts are aware that Tri-Five Chevy pickups and Ford F-100s have weird-fitting rear fenders. They're narrower in the back than in the front. Perhaps Ford and GM gave them a taper so that mud wouldn't load up inside them as fast when these pickups were used as farm and ranch trucks. Now that vintage trucks are becoming show- and cruisehorses as opposed to workhorses, we desire the biggest and most awesome-looking wheels and tires on our custom classic trucks. There are several ways to customize a mid-'50s vintage GM or Ford pickup to overcome such a wheel/tire fitment challenge: go fenderless; buy wider fiberglass or sheetmetal aftermarket fenders; fabricate pie-cut sheetmetal filler pieces, shape them, and weld them; or take two sets of rear fenders and make one perfect-fitting set. Which option do you think No Limit Engineering picked when they decided to work more customizing wonders on the '56 F-100 giveaway truck?

No Limit founder Rob MacGregor chose the best and most cost-effective approach. He contacted Dennis at Dennis Carpenter Ford & Cushman Reproductions in Concord, North Carolina, and talked Dennis into providing two sets of rear fenders for the giveaway truck. Rob explained to us that making one set of custom fenders from two sets of new reproduction sheetmetal fenders will yield near-perfect results with less time, effort, and money spent. We thought, There's no way he can be right, until we watched one of his technicians, Carlos, make it so. See how the pros fabricate some hot rod hauler fenders for the '56 F-100 giveaway truck, the pickup that will be awarded to a fortunate 28th Annual F-100 SuperNationals and Ford Family Reunion attendee (May 18-20, 2006). No Limit Engineering makes it look so easy, you'll want to modify the fenders on your Tri-Five or Effie.

SOURCE
Dennis Carpenter Ford & Cushman Reproductions
4140 Concord Pkwy. S. Dept. CCT
Concord
NC  28027
No Limit Engineering
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